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've worked for "the new york times," then it are chief reporter around the world. you're an organist can especially speedy written a book on organ music. living with guns, how did you come to this topic? >> safely because i lived abroad for so many years. i would often be asked by friends in those countries, what is it the united states and americans and guns? what he is such a love affair with guns is the way some of them was sometimes put it. i do my best to explain, but they realized they didn't know myself, so i thought when i retired, when i time i would try to do some research and find out why we have the second amendment and how has it been understood during all the years it's been enforced in the book was the result. >> host: read the book with interest. you cover the history, legal battles, what's going on current day. let's go through a lot of back and starting with the history. with surprise to many of the american history insolvable guns plater didn't play. >> guest: i grew up in massachusetts in the 50s and of course he made a big thing of thanksgiving and not this weekend s
, interestingly, came as a surprise to me, too, to learn the nra was founded by two "new york times" reporters. >> host: now i know who to blame. >> guest: what they were concerned about was being prepared for national defense like the first world war and making sure that we have enough people in the country who knew how to use firearms that we would not be defeated if it came to a war. >> host: when i grew up, i got the nra badges at summer camp. >> guest: my son got one. >> host: i kept the badges too. it's a point of pride. that was a different nra i think. >> guest: the nra still does a lot of worthwhile training and certifying of ability to use firearms safely, and, but they became politically the leadership that had approved the 68 gun control act was overthrown, replaced by others, and eventually by charles heston was a spokesman for that faction, and now we have, you know, wayne firmly in the saddle, and politically it's very different organization from what it was in 1968, very clearly. it's also been able to raise huge amounts of money and become maybe the most powerful lobby here in
by the former "new york times" reporters. but what they were concerned about is being prepared for the national defense like the first world war and making sure that we have enough people in the country and how to use firearms so that we wouldn't be defeated if it came to a war. >> host: when i was going about my nra marksmanship badges i kept those badges. was a sort of private. >> guest: they still do a lot of worthwhile training and the ability to use firearms safely, but they became politically the leadership that had proven the gun control act was overthrown and replaced by others and eventually charlton heston became a spokesman for that action and now we have been firmly in the saddle, and politically it is a very different organization from what it was in 1968 very clearly. it's also been able to raise huge amounts of money and become maybe the most powerful lobby here in washington. and it plays basically on the backlash on people's fear of crime is rising and the police can't do anything about it, then how are we going to keep ourselves from being robbed and murdered, raped, salon? we
times. he's a celebrity because of the debate with douglas. and the speech in new york. at the end of the date purpose was to win the election. he didn't win the election. a speech he gave in new york. we can remember president obama's speech in 2004. the democratic national convention the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure. four years later was about the speech he's not a pauseble candidate for the presidency. he gives a dazzling speech in new york. when he ran for the senate when president obama gave the speech in 2004 he was running for the senate in senate in jill. illinois he lost. think about president obama run for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election. in illinois lincoln is from illinois. the land of lincoln. huge hometown advantage for him. the reason they put it in chicago by one vote, by the way, think voted to put in chicago by one vote. could have been one vote hasn't concerned it. once it's -- in they weren't worried about the home court advantage. it wasn't a player. right. >> they were lists published by maj
. this is considered is only harvested or mined in one place in the broad and that is herkimer county in new york and cannot get anywhere also are pretty incredibly and also, it is a stone what it gemstone do know that comes as the kurds with the fasting? is a harder courts then your usual words, since midnight take a look at that number on the screen, we sold over 15,000 of these and this is the best price the liver offer because we do have them $69 and change and those sold out and about a couple of seconds we broke records and they sold out in 30 seconds. today we bring you this fabulous data style, they look like rough cut diamonds and they do sparkle, like each of their remarkable is the resume blooming, mon the when you did what they incur warranty and $49.90 if you're shopping tips come in there is nothing more spectacular and they did a beautiful with any complexion, hair fur and a bad day of the great with denim but also because of the white diamonds they possess that tenants, he said with this circuit this and it is truly a tree. you're owning a piece of america, the united states, this
or of one national origin or another. i know here in new york we have several incidents where some sick kids is -- seek kids were targeted by bullying's and physically assaulted so it's about really a way of not coming to terms with differences. is there anything about the families of kids who are bullied that arouse any sort of conclusions to be drawn, or does it cut across all different kinds of things quests. >> guest: while i think families have a picture across the spectrum kids who manifests bullying behavior and i think that's one of the things that is really needed when we look at bullying. we can't just focus on what happens in the hours of the kids are in school. there's a huge amount of pressure from educators to address bullying when they see it in their schools. there are laws passed to varying degrees of effectiveness that have really mandated that schools must be aware of this issue and that must be providing special development and we have gotten to a point in a short period of time really since 2009 for a thing school see their responsibility with regards to this issue in a
as overweight or underweight or of one national origin or another. i know here in new york we had several incidences where some sick kids -- s-i-k-h were targeted by police and physically assaulted. as it is about a way of not coming to terms with differences is their anything about the families of kids who are bullied that allowed any sort of conclusions to be drawn or does this come across like all different kinds? >> guest: families are a huge part of the picture across the spectrum of kids who are bullied and are bystanders and who manifest bullying behavior's and i think that is one of the things that is needed when we look at. we can't just focus on what happens for the hours that kids are at school. i feel that there's been a huge amount of pressure put on educators to address bullying and there are the laws passed in the varying degrees of effectiveness that have mandated that schools must be aware of this issue and they must be providing for professional development and we've got into the point over a very short period of time really since 2009 where i think schools see the respo
>>> guest host and i believe in magic and the executive to return of the new york civil liberties union donna lieberman. this week cynthia lowen and her book bully. in that ms. lowen goes beyond the documentary film and presents personal stories and essays from antibullying activists and experts on how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of t
.rose marie from new york called us last hour and she is buying it for her 12 year-old niece. not only is the free shipping and handling and flex pay great but these are hard to find. there are cheap tablets out there but everybody wants the kindle for the money. do not you want the best? there is the reason my is america's number one selling tablet computer. if you are putting a toe in the water here at hsn i want you to try and do you know that it has a 60 day money back guarantee return policy? we pay to send it to you for $40 on your credit card and if you are getting it for a gift for yourself and maybe a tablet computer for the first time use it and try it and 60 days, you have until the end of january of next year and if it is notything you think this and that you love by the way is a kindle and the kindle fire so you are going to love it. you the little return label on the box you do not have to stand in line or fight with the clerk. 6 c13 that is in the paid -- postage is even paid. c13 is not a store in the world that does that. some things after christmas and i will alertle
infections down? this is a model of management for any industry. in the new york transparency experiment when heart surgery outcomes were publicly reported, i tell a story that mark chesson described where they actually had administrators walking to the unit and asked the doctors and nurses, what do we need to do to get our mortality down? they are asking nurses, how can we decrease at? you don't see that level of common mission around complications except when everything is aligned and there's transparency of data and accountability at all levels for the performance for people who on the system. i remember hearing the story of a nurse saying we have never seen a ceo here in the cardiac icu except when we had public reporting of heart surgery outcomes. you realize these are old-fashioned concepts and these are american concepts. they are not public art -- -- republican or democratic. transparency is american value. we expected at the white house, we expected of congress, we expected up wall street. sarbanes-oxley will have a ceo go to jail if they misreport their earnings for a company. hea
infections down? and the new york transparency agreement when the heart surgery outcomes were publicly reported that mark described with the have administrators walk into the units would we need to do to get our mortality down we are asking nurses why is the complication rate hike and how can we decrease it? we see that level, national and reducing the complications except when everything is aligned there is accountability at all levels of performance and people on the system we've never seen the ceo in the cardiac i see you except when we had public importing of heart surgery outcomes they are not republican or democrat balances, transparency is american value, we expected it at the white house and we expected at the commerce and expected it out will st. we had the ceo go to jail if they miss report their earnings for the company it's almost as if you can miss report infractions there's not little transparency and if we treated differently we have to start treating health care like we do any of their business to reduce the waste and reduce the cost for everyday americans and people ar
, and it controlled new york city, and the center of the world, and my father was a republican and conservative, and he served in world war ii with eisenhower. so the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which i grew, and everything we did was in the shadow of that. so, i was curious about it. the bomb story does have another origin. the 1930s, had written a book about the scientist. but above all he mentioned this figure about henry wallace, and how he could have been president in 1944 but he was bumped by the political bosses. and that led, of course, to the '45 decision by truman and became the origin for a great documentary or movie, and at the tried. wrote a script. didn't work. but ten years later, that -- still teaching the class, and he -- we decided to go ahead and do a documentary about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned ultimately into a bigger -- our eyes were bigger than our stomachs and we tried for a 12-hour national security state story, from 1940s until now. actually we started in 1900, the philippine-american war. but -- spanish american war and ended up in 2012.
in the atomic bomb always fascinated me because i was born the year after it was dropped and it was in new york city, the center of the world and my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scientist of the 30s and above all the mentioned this figure about henry wallace and how he could've been president in 1944 but he was bumped by the political bosses. that led of course to the 45 decision by truman. then we begin the origin of a great idea for a documentary or a movie and he wrote a script. it didn't work for me, but 10 years later it haunted me that story in washington and he is still teaching a class when i came back. we decided to go ahead and do it.mandari about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned into ultimately -- our eyes are bigger than our stomachs and we tried a 12 hour national security state story from the 1940s to now and it a
to people in terms of some of the things going on. and makes "the new york times" bestsellers list, et cetera. i'm interested to know the comments of your peers in this, both younger physicians, older physicians. use the term old guard a couple times. he put this out to, talk about this. many people are recognizing the. talk a little bit about what impact did that and really how people feel of the feet tactic again. >> guest: i've gotten thousands of letters, many of which are handwritten. tens of thousands of e-mails that say my mom died because of a medical mistake. we didn't feel it we were a part of the process. we didn't feel we were given all of our options. we feel there was a mistake or know there was a mistake. thank you for sharing this story. it's almost as if everybody has the story. at that personal accounts here of people i know that had suffered from medical mistakes. everybody had the story. it's the number three cause of death is medical mistake. i think there's this general appreciation for talking about this openly and honestly. the younger.yours in particular come f
totally carry this, my sons would carry this. >>guest: my son is a lawyer in new york city he does not check luggage. he was like i want the black. i was like ok. you are not getting it yet. >>host: it is very classy. my son is a huge international traveler, same thing. and they are picky. they want to look nice.if you are shopping for your son or grandson or a son-in-3 they traveled little bit, this is an incredible gift. >>guest: or the husband or men in your life. >>host: for us, you can see how classy this looks. >>guest: the black is pretty. >>host: it is hard to pick. >>guest: i want to open up the browned. this becomes your trunk. -- you could take the drawers out and lay it down like itor regular suitcase. i have boots slippers. you can fit so much,2500 cubic inches of storage capacity. then you zip it up so you never need to pack or unpack when you go anywhere. you get the shoulder strap for the barrel-tote. luggage cuff. it snaps on the handle and even on your if you want to. then you get the hanging toiletry bag we put a carry-on luggage. and you get the luggag
university of new york argues that slavery was the foremost reason for the civil war. walter bender, charles cain, jody corners, and neil donahue who all contributed to creating the company one laptop per child was that a company history and provided an outline for other social of japan yours in learning to change the world, the social impact of one lap top per child. in napoleon, left a legacy, and
had a tough group are not him but it was his own doing. "the new york times" called his economic adviser the constellation of the reubenites, and they were. they were larry summers and these were wall street people that were brought into the policies or not depriving it of a foreign policy team robert gates has been up to his eyeballs in things the country has done for decades. >> this was promised to the campaign 2008 that he pulls us out of iraq so in some ways he is just following through on his promise. >> he has supported him strongly and if they do they were not taken seriously enough and then it would take us in a big mistake. the work on a number of fronts. he said it would be the transparency president of that he is going to cut back on all of push's secrecy. and in much ways he hasn't followed through. between 1917 and three people were indicted in to the act and they've invited six. they are very critical to a lot of things. but one is the treatment for example of bradley manning who has campaigned against assange heuvel released the documents that's very problematic b
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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